Feminism · herkind.com · Media · Men · News and current affairs · Women

Emma Watson: The New Face of Feminism?

I’ve been saying for years that a) feminism needs, not a new monicker, but a new leader; and  b) women need to engage men in the movement.

The new UN #HeForShe initiative, and its spokesperson, encapsulate both:

Here are my thoughts on why feminism needs a relate-able leader.

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Books and Authors · herkind.com · News and current affairs

Fall Books Preview, Ottawa Citizen

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Ann-Marie MacDonald has a new novel coming out this fall called Adult Onset. It’s her first in 11 years.

Here’s my annual fall books preview in the Ottawa Citizen.

general · herkind.com

Happy New Year, 2014

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I’m pretty happy to see 2014!

Each New Year`s Eve, I perform a ritual that is so ingrained now that when I think I might not get a chance to do it, I actually begin to panic. It`s just something I need to do in order to face a new year with renewed faith and optimism in myself and my future.

Here`s what I do:

I take out my journal from the previous year, which has a list of goals for the year. I assess each goal with the following criteria: 1) accomplished, 2) still to do, 3) abandoned for good reason. I tally up each list and that gives me an idea of the balance of the year. Did I accomplish more than not? Did I rightly abandon some goals? Is my still-to-do column a repeat of last year’s?

Once I see where I’m at I write out my list of highlights for the year: work, personal life, health, family. This time ’round it helped that I had kept a Joy Jar that held little descriptions of some of the happier moments of 2013. This is the part of the ritual where I count my blessings and remind myself that, no matter the difficulties,  the year was still filled with fun, joy and fulfillment.

Then I create a new list of goals. Some are continuations, some are totally new plans that are built on the progress, or because of a need to change direction.

I start this all at around 11 pm so that by the time midnight rolls around it’s done, and I’m filled with resolve and energy for new opportunities. Some people I know are full of this forward-looking momentum at the beginning of the school year, a throw-back to their years when September marked a fresh start. But since I have an end-of-the-year birthday, it just makes sense for me to do my review then. In fact, it just naturally happens that way.

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This is my 2013 Joy Jar, more than half full.

I had a difficult work year in 2013, and I know I’m not the only one. What a relief to know that, although that fact took its toll on me, my Joy Jar revealed that my most content moments came through time spent with friends, surrounded by music, with my nose in a book,  or with the two activities that sustain and inspire me: baking and writing.

All was not lost. It never is.

Books and Authors · herkind.com · The Writing Life

IFOA stories: Ken Kesey teaches me to parallel park, circa 1992

To celebrate the start of the International Festival of Authors (IFOA) in Toronto this week I’ll be reminiscing about my precious time spent with authors over the many years of working in and around publishing.

First up: Ken Kesey at the IFOA in 1992

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Ken Kesey’s parting gift to me, a handmade scarf depicting Native American art, and signed: For Carla – thanx – Ken.

 

This was the festival where we had to make everything about baseball or we wouldn’t get media coverage or author participation! That’s because the Toronto Blue Jays had made it to the World Series – in fact they won it on the last night of the festival – and Toronto was in the frenzied grip of baseball fever.

Just like McMurphy in One Flew Over the Cuckoos Nest, Ken Kesey, who was at the festival with his book Sailor Song, never wanted to be away from a television if the game was on. Read  more

Books and Authors · herkind.com · Media · News and current affairs · The Writing Life · Vancouver

Personal memories of Alice Munro, Nobel Laureate!

“That’s a lovely skirt. Tell me, is it difficult to iron all those pleats?”

In the green room of the North York Centre for the Performing Arts, I’m keeping Alice Munro company until it’s time for her to step on stage for her rare double-bill appearance with Robertson Davies. I’m not sure who’s minding Mr. Davies, but I definitely got the good gig!

Of course, I want to gush to her about how Friend of My Youth (her 7th and my cherished title) changed my life, about how her writing is such an inspiration and how reading it makes me somehow feel less alone.  But she wants to talk about something… anything else, as a way to calm her nerves. I’m happy to oblige her every need. In fact my job as the publicist for the Harbourfront Reading Series which is presenting the evening’s event, depends on seeing to her comfort. So, we talk about the challenges of keeping well-formed pleats in my skirt.

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Alice Munro signed my copy of Friend of My Youth, 1994

When she’s sufficiently relaxed, I shyly ask her to sign my copy.

That was in 1994. I declared my PR career could end then since I reached the ultimate goal of meeting and chatting with my favourite author.

Fast forward to 1998, Ms. Munro is up for the coveted Giller Prize for The Love of a Good Woman. I’m production coordinating the live-from-the-cocktail party portion of the Giller Prize broadcast on Bravo! where I work as PR director. Of course, the producers and hosts want to talk to her, but knowing as I do about her shyness and reluctance to be in the public eye, I keep telling them she will likely not show up until the absolute last minute. Sure enough, she sneaks by all the cameras into her seat in the Four Seasons ballroom.

Her acceptance speech is a very humble few words about how maybe now the short story will gain acceptance as a legitimate form of writing.

I didn’t speak to her that night, just simply basked in her graceful, winning aura.

Alice Munro at VPL
Alice Munro accepts the George Woodcock Lifetime Achievement Award at Vancouver Public Library. Also pictured, Mayor Larry Campbell and VPL Board Chair Joan Anderson, 2005.

In Vancouver in 2005, I get to talk to Alice Munro one more time after she accepts the George Woodcock Lifetime Achievement Award in the atrium of the beautiful Vancouver Public Library main branch. I line up to congratulate her and to my absolute astonishment, she remembers me from those many years ago in the green room at the North York arts centre. I wish I could tell you what we talked about that day at the library. I think I was overwhelmed knowing she could recall ever meeting me!  She invited me into the small private gathering inside the library.

What I remember most is her warmth, grace and the generous way she spoke to her fans and colleagues that day.

I’m so pleased she’s won the Nobel. I can’t think of a more deserving or worthy Canadian writer whose first thought, when accepting this honour, was directed to those for whom she’s set the trail.

“I would really hope that this would make people see the short story as an important art, not just something that you played around with until you’d got a novel written.”

Sadly, Alice Munro has announced her retirement from writing.  But then again, she’s put so much of her singular talent out into the world, we can only be happy and grateful for it, and for her.

Books and Authors · herkind.com · Vancouver

Vancouver’s Shaena Lambert, Oh My Darling, review

I once heard Doug Coupland refer to book reviews as “homework,” and there is an element of drudgery to them. That is, unless you get assigned a great book that you would read even if you didn’t have to.

lambertOh, My Darling by Vancouver writer Shaena Lambert is one of those. If you appreciate finely crafted short fiction, this is well worth the read.

Here’s my Globe and Mail review: Shaena Lambert’s life in miniature

Books and Authors · herkind.com · Media · News and current affairs · The Writing Life · TVO: The Agenda · Vancouver

Reading is always a good choice: Fall books preview 2013

worst person ever
Best. Author. Ever.

Every year for the past six I’ve written a fall books preview for the Ottawa Citizen. It’s labour intensive in the sense that I have to research all the fall offerings from the many large and small publisher catalogues (most are online now, which helps) then write a succinct few sentences on a variety of books ranging from fiction to non-fiction, lifestyle to memoir, biography, food, sports and Young Adult/Kids books. Since I’m writing largely from marketing copy with so few books actually finished or even in the advance reading copy stage, it takes awhile to come up with something new, fresh and lively to say. The task takes me awhile to research and a longer while to write.

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A lively YA read.

Still, I love doing it because a) it introduces me to the new exciting list; b) I get boxes of books, the equivalent of Christmas morning to a book-lover; c) it’s become an annual assignment that I can count on.

So without further ado: Fall Book Season: Fact and Fiction

This year we added a side bar: What they’re reading this fall

My personal recommendations are:

Shaena Lambert, Oh My Darling 

all stories take place in and around Vancouver; she has unusual ways of describing the most common of feelings

Joseph Boyden, The Orenda

it’s been too long since we’ve heard this important and interesting literary voice

Doug Coupland, Worst. Person. Ever.

Favourite. Author. Ever. / Most. Inspirational. Creative mind. Ever.

Stephanie Domet, Fallsy Downsies

another inspirational person and wonderful writer

Steve Paikin, Paikin and the Premiers: Personal Reflections on a Half Century of Ontario Leaders.

Steve Paikin is my best example of a hard working, wide-brained, fully engaged and professional journalist and a helluva nice guy

Gail Gallant, Apparition

I love YA novels and this one is a page turner. Also, you gotta love a TV writer turned novelist!

Happy Reading!